CONVERTED SCHOOL HOUSES, and TRAIN STATIONS

Posted by Judy Cholfe on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Under: Exploring

CONVERTED SCHOOL HOUSES, and TRAIN STATIONS

CONVERTED SCHOOL HOUSES — 23/04/14

Hi everyone! Hope you all had a wonderful Easter weekend? 
The snow in my back yard has FINALLY, FINALLY melted.
I have bought top soil to put in the flower beds, so I’m dying to get out there. I have loads of bulbs coming up already. I do have more I want to plant though.

Today, I’m showing you some pictures of converted school houses, and railyway stations around my area, and also, throught-out the U.S. (that are actually up for sale)……
Some have become the most amazing homes, be they single family dwellings, apartments and condos, and others are now small community centres……

The Old Knox School:This sweet school house in my area, has now become a community centre.

The Old Nantyr School: This lovely conversion to a single family home has had an addition built on the back. So pretty sitting in the trees.


I never knew the name of this one, but lovely just the same. Last fall the owners did a large addition at the back.


Again, I don’t know the actual name when this one was a school. You can see the original school building, and an addition has been built onto the existing.


They kept the placement and style of the original windows on the school house, but replaced with energy efficient ones.

I also took a couple of pictures of some converted railway stations…..


This old railway station has been lovingly transformed into a house. There are actually two separate buildings. (Almost like a granny suite).
The owners have also placed a small piece of track at the front of the house, (station), and have a flat car on display…...SO COOL!!!!


I do have one more station to show you. However, it has not been made into a house….At this time it stands empty, but has been set up as retail space on the lakeshore.


This used to be the Allendale Train Station. It became extremely run down and unsafe,due to fire, but the City took over the site and re-built it almost as it was in its hay-day.
History/Background
Nestled on the south-eastern edge of the City of Barrie overlooking Kempenfelt Bay, the Allandale Train Station was the hub of activity in the early 1900’s for the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR). The station buildings consisted of a passenger depot and restaurant as well as a two storey office building. Three years after the bankruptcy of the GTR in 1919, the Allandale Train Station came under the jurisdiction of the Canadian National Railways (CNR). Following years of declining passenger and freight traffic, Allandale was downgraded from a divisional point to a station in 1959. Due to the diminishing rail service, the passenger depot and restaurant were closed during the 1980’s. VIA Rail and GO Transit last used the office building as a passenger waiting room and for ticket sales briefly in the early 1990’s. Since then CKVR/CHUM had interest in the Allandale Train Station in 2002. The City is undertaking the overall restoration and programming of the Allandale Train Station project and the Station Lands. A fire in 2009 caused significant damage to the western portion of the restaurant building.

Heritage
The Allandale Train Station was designated under the Federal Heritage Railway Stations Act, which is administered by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada. It is our understanding from Ontario Heritage Trust that any railway station designated under this Act must be owned by a federally regulated entity. The Station is now owned by the City of Barrie and as ownership is with a municipality, the Station is no longer protected by the Act. As well, the restoration of the Allandale Train Station is under the guidance of the Ontario Heritage Trust. The heritage value of the Allandale Train Station resides in its picturesque massing, the composition of its elevations, its residential scale, Italianate Villa detailing and its visual as well as symbolic identity with the community. The characteristic picturesque elements of the turn-of-the-century railway stations include the wide overhanging eaves, covered outdoor waiting areas, dominating rooflines and a non-frontal asymmetrical composition. The massing of this mid-size station consists of three functionally separate elements; the office building, restaurant building and passenger depot; giving the overall composition a residential scale. Visual unity of the parts is achieved by the strong horizontal lines created by the dominant rooflines, the brick plinth, repetitive columns, horizontal windows and transom bars and the narrow horizontal wood siding and wood details such as the stringcourse. The target date of restoration for the Ontario Heritage Trust is 1904 – 1905 for the passenger depot, 1904 – 1905 for the restaurant building and 1895 for the office building.

This is such a perfect spot, making the architecture of the building stand boldly out against the openess surrounding it.(It’s great to be a tourist where you live).

CURBED MAPS
27 Converted Schoolhouses You Can Buy Right This Second

Whether it’s because of housing shortages or trendiness, home conversions—churches! warehouses! military bases! factories!—continue to gush onto the market, and certainly former schoolhouses are no exception. While maybe this is not exactly what your significant other meant when (s)he said (s)he wanted to “go back to school,” some of these properties—from adorable $120K schoolhouses in Ohio to ritzy converted condos in Washington, D.C.—have the right amount of country kitsch and/or ironic academic pseudo-glamour to be rather tempting nonetheless. Do have a look, below.

Now if you’ll all take your seats. »

Well, I hope you enjoy browsing these "want-to-live-in-homes".
You can always dream……….
Have a great week…….Until next time, Judy

Contact me if you would like to set up an appointment, or have questions you need answered, at (705)727-6282 or jcredesigns@gmail.com

JC Redesigns

jcredesigns@gmail.com

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About Me


Judy Cholfe Hi, thanks for stopping by! I am Judy Cholfe, IRP...(Interior Redesign Professional), owner/operator of JC Redesigns, Interior Redesign/Staging-- Servicing Simcoe County and GTA. (705)727-6282 jcredesigns@gmail.com Decorating is my passion and I want to share that passion with you, the client..... I want to energize, motivate, and inspire people to do something fun and creative in their own homes. I also totally love anything DIY.

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